A four year anniversary for two sexy vampires

It is almost exactly four years since Suzie met Cleo in a London nightclub, and to mark that anniversary I have, for one week, dropped the price of Suzie and the Monsters – a fairytale of blood, sex and inhumanity…

When I was growing up, vampires were always dangerous, bloody and sexy, at once wonderful and terrifying. There was, of course, a huge amount of sexploitation influencing that, and vampire stories have always been littered with negative tropes, predictable clichés, absurd plots and entirely unnecessary sex. The past twenty years have seen the urban fantasy and romance genres give birth to paranormal romance in which valiant heroes are no longer merely handsome and rich but also imbued with phenomenal supernatural powers. As escapism, it’s all harmless fun – or mostly harmless, anyway – but as story it’s utterly disconnected from reality.

A piece of advice I read or heard somewhere, I’m not sure where, was that you should only have one improbable thing in the story. Another (possibly related) piece of advice is that readers connect with the humanity of the characters – is it any surprise that writers strive to make their aliens, monsters and robots as human as possible? Is it any surprise that heroic vampires are sweet little bunnies who would never harm a human and only drink animal blood (or, at the worst, bagged hospital blood) – unless, of course, a human invited them to drink from them (aww, how romantic).

I have always been drawn to stories of vampires and assassins, especially but not exclusively female vampires and assassins, and the common theme is a hero who is also a killer. In a world of black and white / dark and light / good and evil, the vampire and the assassin must be both. But whereas an assassin can step into the light, the vampire can never escape the dark. Worse, the vampire is immortal, and the struggle to resist the dark has no end.

How much blood must a vampire take before the light is forever out of reach? How many lives must be taken? How many crimes must be committed against humanity, before the vampire passes beyond forgiveness?

Suzie and the Monsters poses this question. Suzie is a vampire, one who is all alone, without great superpowers, and who may well be beyond forgiveness, though she aches for it. But all the suffering she has caused, and all the suffering she has endured, are nothing compared to the suffering she has witnessed – suffering inflicted by humans on humans. And sometimes it takes one monster to kill another…

About Frank

A Sci-Fi & Fantasy author and lyrical poet with a mild obsession for vampires, succubi, goddesses and Supergirl.
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